Advise on hosting

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Re: Advise on hosting

lucastex
John

Update is running great from here. Got the new version running instantly :)

[]s,


Lucas Frare Teixeira .·.
- [hidden email]
- lucastex.com.br
- blog.lucastex.com
- twitter.com/lucastex


On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 7:57 AM, John Thompson <[hidden email]> wrote:

+1 for beanstalk.

I have Grails deployed via beanstalk for an app under development now.
Beanstalk is managing a micro instance w/grails, and I have a DB instance
using small linux (used an Oracle AMI to create DB).  My only problem so far
is the redeploy does not work as advertised.  It acts like it deploys, but
the old version continues to run.  I just terminate the micro instance &
beanstalk auto-deploys a fresh one (with the right version).

I also have two apps running on EC2 via Cloudfoundry in small instances.
(One is almost a year old)  Cloudfoundry is *very* easy to use.  Although
the could foundry project seems to have gone quiet at Springsource.

Just an observation - my beanstalk app seems more crisp in response than my
Cloudfoundry apps.  This is my perception, I have not done any benchmarks.

Can't speak to AWS support. I have not had any interactions with the support
team yet.

-----
JT
jts-blog.com
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Re: Advise on hosting

lucastex
In reply to this post by John Thompson
> When you create a beanstalk application you will pick a unique name for your app, which will get registered as <yourapp>.elasticbeanstalk.com, from there you
> can register an alias cname - grails.yourdomain.com -> <yourapp>.elasticbeanstalk.com

> This is how I set it up to route my subdomain to beanstalk.  Not sure how to if you want your root domain pointed there (I'm using a hosting acct on Godaddy
> for the static content of the root domain).

Yes, this is how you get your app running. To set up your domain, you'll have to edit your DNS and add a CNAME info to redirect to this <yourapp>.elasticbeanstalk.com. Just this.

> Beanstalk, one instance is effectively free for one year on a AWS promotion.  For the DB I paid 350 for a 3 year reserved instance. (this is one time fee for the
> next 3 years), then it will be ~20 per month. (works out to ~30 bucks a month for the 3 year term)

Long term contracts on aws services really makes the difference. If you will be running it for this time, worth a lot. 

> ** Also this is important - for the DB - I setup an elastic IP (free as long as the instance is up).  This will give you a name like:
> ec2-123-123-123-123.compute-1.amazonaws.com (where the 123... is your elastic IP)  Set this as your host name in your datasource url.

I'm afraid you just confused some stuff :)  The ec2.xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx.compute-1.amazonaws.com it is not a Elastic IP, this is your instance public DNS. It will be changed as soon your instance gets rebooted. If you need to set a host to reach your instance, even if you change witch instance will respond right now (this changes the public DNS), then you'll have to ask for an Elastic IP. This will give you a regular ip xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx and this ip will be yours, poiting to witch instance you want, and you can change the instance responding on this ip on the fly.

And this is a paid service, you pay to get the IP, even if the ip is allocated in an instance or not.

> When running in ec2, the domain ec2-123-123-123-123.compute-1.amazonaws.com will resolve to a internal AWS IP - which will not count in your data
> transfer charges.

Perfect! The same for uploading data from ec2 instances to S3 service.

[]s,


Lucas Frare Teixeira .·.
- [hidden email]
- lucastex.com.br
- blog.lucastex.com
- twitter.com/lucastex


On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 8:55 AM, John Thompson <[hidden email]> wrote:
When you create a beanstalk application you will pick a unique name for your app, which will get registered as <yourapp>.elasticbeanstalk.com, from there you can register an alias cname - grails.yourdomain.com -> <yourapp>.elasticbeanstalk.com

This is how I set it up to route my subdomain to beanstalk.  Not sure how to if you want your root domain pointed there (I'm using a hosting acct on Godaddy for the static content of the root domain).

Beanstalk, one instance is effectively free for one year on a AWS promotion.  For the DB I paid 350 for a 3 year reserved instance. (this is one time fee for the next 3 years), then it will be ~20 per month. (works out to ~30 bucks a month for the 3 year term)

** Also this is important - for the DB - I setup an elastic IP (free as long as the instance is up).  This will give you a name like: ec2-123-123-123-123.compute-1.amazonaws.com (where the 123... is your elastic IP)  Set this as your host name in your datasource url.

When running in ec2, the domain ec2-123-123-123-123.compute-1.amazonaws.com will resolve to a internal AWS IP - which will not count in your data transfer charges.

On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 5:27 AM, steviemo [via Grails] <[hidden email]> wrote:
Sounds good John,

I'm seriously considering beanstalk. Can i ask how you register a
domain to use for your beanstalk instance? I can't see anything on the
AWS website related to registering domain names.
Also, how is the monthly cost fairing on beanstalk?

Thanks,
Stephen

On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 9:57 AM, John Thompson [via Grails]
<[hidden email]> wrote:

> +1 for beanstalk.
>
> I have Grails deployed via beanstalk for an app under development now.
>  Beanstalk is managing a micro instance w/grails, and I have a DB instance
> using small linux (used an Oracle AMI to create DB).  My only problem so far
> is the redeploy does not work as advertised.  It acts like it deploys, but
> the old version continues to run.  I just terminate the micro instance &
> beanstalk auto-deploys a fresh one (with the right version).
>
> I also have two apps running on EC2 via Cloudfoundry in small instances.
> (One is almost a year old)  Cloudfoundry is *very* easy to use.  Although
> the could foundry project seems to have gone quiet at Springsource.
>
> Just an observation - my beanstalk app seems more crisp in response than my
> Cloudfoundry apps.  This is my perception, I have not done any benchmarks.
>
> Can't speak to AWS support. I have not had any interactions with the support
> team yet.
> JT
> jts-blog.com
>
> ________________________________
> If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the discussion
> below:
> http://grails.1312388.n4.nabble.com/Advise-on-hosting-tp3276494p3296926.html
> To unsubscribe from Advise on hosting, click here.



If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the discussion below:
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Re: Advise on hosting

tomas lin
Lucas man, we need a blog post on this - I'll even translate it from
Portuguese for you.

On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 11:24 AM, Lucas F. A. Teixeira
<[hidden email]> wrote:

>> When you create a beanstalk application you will pick a unique name for
>> your app, which will get registered as <yourapp>.elasticbeanstalk.com, from
>> there you
>> can register an alias cname - grails.yourdomain.com ->
>> <yourapp>.elasticbeanstalk.com
>
>> This is how I set it up to route my subdomain to beanstalk.  Not sure how
>> to if you want your root domain pointed there (I'm using a hosting acct on
>> Godaddy
>> for the static content of the root domain).
>
> Yes, this is how you get your app running. To set up your domain, you'll
> have to edit your DNS and add a CNAME info to redirect to this
> <yourapp>.elasticbeanstalk.com. Just this.
>
>> Beanstalk, one instance is effectively free for one year on a AWS
>> promotion.  For the DB I paid 350 for a 3 year reserved instance. (this is
>> one time fee for the
>> next 3 years), then it will be ~20 per month. (works out to ~30 bucks a
>> month for the 3 year term)
>
> Long term contracts on aws services really makes the difference. If you will
> be running it for this time, worth a lot.
>
>> ** Also this is important - for the DB - I setup an elastic IP (free as
>> long as the instance is up).  This will give you a name like:
>> ec2-123-123-123-123.compute-1.amazonaws.com (where the 123... is your
>> elastic IP)  Set this as your host name in your datasource url.
>
> I'm afraid you just confused some stuff :)  The
> ec2.xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx.compute-1.amazonaws.com it is not a Elastic IP, this is
> your instance public DNS. It will be changed as soon your instance gets
> rebooted. If you need to set a host to reach your instance, even if you
> change witch instance will respond right now (this changes the public DNS),
> then you'll have to ask for an Elastic IP. This will give you a regular ip
> xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx and this ip will be yours, poiting to witch instance you
> want, and you can change the instance responding on this ip on the fly.
>
> And this is a paid service, you pay to get the IP, even if the ip is
> allocated in an instance or not.
>
>> When running in ec2, the domain
>> ec2-123-123-123-123.compute-1.amazonaws.com will resolve to a internal AWS
>> IP - which will not count in your data
>> transfer charges.
>
> Perfect! The same for uploading data from ec2 instances to S3 service.
>
> []s,
>
>
> Lucas Frare Teixeira .·.
> - [hidden email]
> - lucastex.com.br
> - blog.lucastex.com
> - twitter.com/lucastex
>
>
> On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 8:55 AM, John Thompson <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>> When you create a beanstalk application you will pick a unique name for
>> your app, which will get registered as <yourapp>.elasticbeanstalk.com, from
>> there you can register an alias cname - grails.yourdomain.com ->
>> <yourapp>.elasticbeanstalk.com
>>
>> This is how I set it up to route my subdomain to beanstalk.  Not sure how
>> to if you want your root domain pointed there (I'm using a hosting acct on
>> Godaddy for the static content of the root domain).
>>
>> Beanstalk, one instance is effectively free for one year on a AWS
>> promotion.  For the DB I paid 350 for a 3 year reserved instance. (this is
>> one time fee for the next 3 years), then it will be ~20 per month. (works
>> out to ~30 bucks a month for the 3 year term)
>>
>> ** Also this is important - for the DB - I setup an elastic IP (free as
>> long as the instance is up).  This will give you a name like:
>> ec2-123-123-123-123.compute-1.amazonaws.com (where the 123... is your
>> elastic IP)  Set this as your host name in your datasource url.
>>
>> When running in ec2, the domain
>> ec2-123-123-123-123.compute-1.amazonaws.com will resolve to a internal AWS
>> IP - which will not count in your data transfer charges.
>>
>> On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 5:27 AM, steviemo [via Grails] <[hidden email]>
>> wrote:
>>>
>>> Sounds good John,
>>>
>>> I'm seriously considering beanstalk. Can i ask how you register a
>>> domain to use for your beanstalk instance? I can't see anything on the
>>> AWS website related to registering domain names.
>>> Also, how is the monthly cost fairing on beanstalk?
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>> Stephen
>>>
>>> On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 9:57 AM, John Thompson [via Grails]
>>> <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>> > +1 for beanstalk.
>>> >
>>> > I have Grails deployed via beanstalk for an app under development now.
>>> >  Beanstalk is managing a micro instance w/grails, and I have a DB
>>> > instance
>>> > using small linux (used an Oracle AMI to create DB).  My only problem
>>> > so far
>>> > is the redeploy does not work as advertised.  It acts like it deploys,
>>> > but
>>> > the old version continues to run.  I just terminate the micro instance
>>> > &
>>> > beanstalk auto-deploys a fresh one (with the right version).
>>> >
>>> > I also have two apps running on EC2 via Cloudfoundry in small
>>> > instances.
>>> > (One is almost a year old)  Cloudfoundry is *very* easy to use.
>>> >  Although
>>> > the could foundry project seems to have gone quiet at Springsource.
>>> >
>>> > Just an observation - my beanstalk app seems more crisp in response
>>> > than my
>>> > Cloudfoundry apps.  This is my perception, I have not done any
>>> > benchmarks.
>>> >
>>> > Can't speak to AWS support. I have not had any interactions with the
>>> > support
>>> > team yet.
>>> > JT
>>> > jts-blog.com
>>> >
>>> > ________________________________
>>> > If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the
>>> > discussion
>>> > below:
>>> >
>>> > http://grails.1312388.n4.nabble.com/Advise-on-hosting-tp3276494p3296926.html
>>> > To unsubscribe from Advise on hosting, click here.
>>>
>>>
>>> ________________________________
>>> If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the discussion
>>> below:
>>>
>>> http://grails.1312388.n4.nabble.com/Advise-on-hosting-tp3276494p3296982.html
>>> To unsubscribe from Advise on hosting, click here.
>>
>> JT
>> jts-blog.com
>> ________________________________
>> View this message in context: Re: Advise on hosting
>> Sent from the Grails - user mailing list archive at Nabble.com.
>
>

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Re: Advise on hosting

lucastex
shame on me... :(



Lucas Frare Teixeira .·.
- [hidden email]
- lucastex.com.br
- blog.lucastex.com
- twitter.com/lucastex


On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 9:33 AM, Tomas Lin <[hidden email]> wrote:
Lucas man, we need a blog post on this - I'll even translate it from
Portuguese for you.

On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 11:24 AM, Lucas F. A. Teixeira
<[hidden email]> wrote:
>> When you create a beanstalk application you will pick a unique name for
>> your app, which will get registered as <yourapp>.elasticbeanstalk.com, from
>> there you
>> can register an alias cname - grails.yourdomain.com ->
>> <yourapp>.elasticbeanstalk.com
>
>> This is how I set it up to route my subdomain to beanstalk.  Not sure how
>> to if you want your root domain pointed there (I'm using a hosting acct on
>> Godaddy
>> for the static content of the root domain).
>
> Yes, this is how you get your app running. To set up your domain, you'll
> have to edit your DNS and add a CNAME info to redirect to this
> <yourapp>.elasticbeanstalk.com. Just this.
>
>> Beanstalk, one instance is effectively free for one year on a AWS
>> promotion.  For the DB I paid 350 for a 3 year reserved instance. (this is
>> one time fee for the
>> next 3 years), then it will be ~20 per month. (works out to ~30 bucks a
>> month for the 3 year term)
>
> Long term contracts on aws services really makes the difference. If you will
> be running it for this time, worth a lot.
>
>> ** Also this is important - for the DB - I setup an elastic IP (free as
>> long as the instance is up).  This will give you a name like:
>> ec2-123-123-123-123.compute-1.amazonaws.com (where the 123... is your
>> elastic IP)  Set this as your host name in your datasource url.
>
> I'm afraid you just confused some stuff :)  The
> ec2.xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx.compute-1.amazonaws.com it is not a Elastic IP, this is
> your instance public DNS. It will be changed as soon your instance gets
> rebooted. If you need to set a host to reach your instance, even if you
> change witch instance will respond right now (this changes the public DNS),
> then you'll have to ask for an Elastic IP. This will give you a regular ip
> xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx and this ip will be yours, poiting to witch instance you
> want, and you can change the instance responding on this ip on the fly.
>
> And this is a paid service, you pay to get the IP, even if the ip is
> allocated in an instance or not.
>
>> When running in ec2, the domain
>> ec2-123-123-123-123.compute-1.amazonaws.com will resolve to a internal AWS
>> IP - which will not count in your data
>> transfer charges.
>
> Perfect! The same for uploading data from ec2 instances to S3 service.
>
> []s,
>
>
> Lucas Frare Teixeira .·.
> - [hidden email]
> - lucastex.com.br
> - blog.lucastex.com
> - twitter.com/lucastex
>
>
> On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 8:55 AM, John Thompson <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>> When you create a beanstalk application you will pick a unique name for
>> your app, which will get registered as <yourapp>.elasticbeanstalk.com, from
>> there you can register an alias cname - grails.yourdomain.com ->
>> <yourapp>.elasticbeanstalk.com
>>
>> This is how I set it up to route my subdomain to beanstalk.  Not sure how
>> to if you want your root domain pointed there (I'm using a hosting acct on
>> Godaddy for the static content of the root domain).
>>
>> Beanstalk, one instance is effectively free for one year on a AWS
>> promotion.  For the DB I paid 350 for a 3 year reserved instance. (this is
>> one time fee for the next 3 years), then it will be ~20 per month. (works
>> out to ~30 bucks a month for the 3 year term)
>>
>> ** Also this is important - for the DB - I setup an elastic IP (free as
>> long as the instance is up).  This will give you a name like:
>> ec2-123-123-123-123.compute-1.amazonaws.com (where the 123... is your
>> elastic IP)  Set this as your host name in your datasource url.
>>
>> When running in ec2, the domain
>> ec2-123-123-123-123.compute-1.amazonaws.com will resolve to a internal AWS
>> IP - which will not count in your data transfer charges.
>>
>> On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 5:27 AM, steviemo [via Grails] <[hidden email]>
>> wrote:
>>>
>>> Sounds good John,
>>>
>>> I'm seriously considering beanstalk. Can i ask how you register a
>>> domain to use for your beanstalk instance? I can't see anything on the
>>> AWS website related to registering domain names.
>>> Also, how is the monthly cost fairing on beanstalk?
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>> Stephen
>>>
>>> On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 9:57 AM, John Thompson [via Grails]
>>> <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>> > +1 for beanstalk.
>>> >
>>> > I have Grails deployed via beanstalk for an app under development now.
>>> >  Beanstalk is managing a micro instance w/grails, and I have a DB
>>> > instance
>>> > using small linux (used an Oracle AMI to create DB).  My only problem
>>> > so far
>>> > is the redeploy does not work as advertised.  It acts like it deploys,
>>> > but
>>> > the old version continues to run.  I just terminate the micro instance
>>> > &
>>> > beanstalk auto-deploys a fresh one (with the right version).
>>> >
>>> > I also have two apps running on EC2 via Cloudfoundry in small
>>> > instances.
>>> > (One is almost a year old)  Cloudfoundry is *very* easy to use.
>>> >  Although
>>> > the could foundry project seems to have gone quiet at Springsource.
>>> >
>>> > Just an observation - my beanstalk app seems more crisp in response
>>> > than my
>>> > Cloudfoundry apps.  This is my perception, I have not done any
>>> > benchmarks.
>>> >
>>> > Can't speak to AWS support. I have not had any interactions with the
>>> > support
>>> > team yet.
>>> > JT
>>> > jts-blog.com
>>> >
>>> > ________________________________
>>> > If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the
>>> > discussion
>>> > below:
>>> >
>>> > http://grails.1312388.n4.nabble.com/Advise-on-hosting-tp3276494p3296926.html
>>> > To unsubscribe from Advise on hosting, click here.
>>>
>>>
>>> ________________________________
>>> If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the discussion
>>> below:
>>>
>>> http://grails.1312388.n4.nabble.com/Advise-on-hosting-tp3276494p3296982.html
>>> To unsubscribe from Advise on hosting, click here.
>>
>> JT
>> jts-blog.com
>> ________________________________
>> View this message in context: Re: Advise on hosting
>> Sent from the Grails - user mailing list archive at Nabble.com.
>
>

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Re: Advise on hosting

rbramley
In reply to this post by bkane
bkane wrote
... we have successfully deployed
a small grails app to the Rackspace Cloud (
http://www.rackspacecloud.com/cloud_hosting_products/servers/pricing/).  We
started on one of their 512mb instances at $20/month.  If you are running
just the app and a simple DB it works fine. The upgrade process is easy when
you want to expand as well.  I did the upgrade from 512mb to 1024mb and it
took less than 10 minutes to resize the instance and have everything back up
and running.

Rackspace is great if you don't mind doing all the administrative/setup
stuff yourself.  Beanstalk and AWS in general give you more options for load
balancing, e-mail, storage, etc.  With Rackspace you get more control, but
have to do it yourself.  In an evening I had the instance up, installed JDK,
Tomcat 6, MySQL on Ubuntu 10.04 and our application deployed and running
smoothly.
I've deployed a number of Grails apps for clients on Debian to Slicehost (which is now owned by Rackspace) typically on 1GB slices. They are quick to provision and the control panel / console / API is very good for management & the support is very responsive to requests (e.g. for resizing).
Again it's DIY admin but they have some good tutorial posts for Linux novices (including securing your slice).  Reckon on a few hours to install the necessary packages (JDK, Tomcat, MySQL), configure iptables & exim, deploy your war file etc.

However the pricing is no longer as competitive as it once was @ $70 pcm for a 1GB slice + $15 pcm for snapshot backups. Rackspace Cloud is billed hourly - estimated at $43.80 month for 1GB.

In our case, most of the slices & OS packages have been centrally configuration managed (from Puppet), backed up (file-level using BackupPC) and monitored (using Opsview).

I'd used mor.ph ages ago for a hobby project (was frustrating having to redeploy) and had been considering Amazon micro and now elastic beanstalk for the next one...

Robin

----
Twitter: @rbramley
Blog: http://leanjavaengineering.wordpress.com
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Re: Advise on hosting

lucastex
We can go even further here...

People are discussing two different services here. Just infrastructure, witch is what slicehost, amazon (pure amazon instances), rackspace, enjoyvps and others does. But when you need the infrastructure to run the application, and don't even want to get inside the infra, configure it and others, now we're talking about plataforms of deployment and management. This is what Beanstalk, Scalr, CloudFoundry and others does :)

[]s,


Lucas Frare Teixeira .·.
- [hidden email]
- lucastex.com.br
- blog.lucastex.com
- twitter.com/lucastex


On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 10:11 AM, rbramley <[hidden email]> wrote:


bkane wrote:
>
> ... we have successfully deployed
> a small grails app to the Rackspace Cloud (
> http://www.rackspacecloud.com/cloud_hosting_products/servers/pricing/).
> We
> started on one of their 512mb instances at $20/month.  If you are running
> just the app and a simple DB it works fine. The upgrade process is easy
> when
> you want to expand as well.  I did the upgrade from 512mb to 1024mb and it
> took less than 10 minutes to resize the instance and have everything back
> up
> and running.
>
> Rackspace is great if you don't mind doing all the administrative/setup
> stuff yourself.  Beanstalk and AWS in general give you more options for
> load
> balancing, e-mail, storage, etc.  With Rackspace you get more control, but
> have to do it yourself.  In an evening I had the instance up, installed
> JDK,
> Tomcat 6, MySQL on Ubuntu 10.04 and our application deployed and running
> smoothly.
>

I've deployed a number of Grails apps for clients on Debian to Slicehost
(which is now owned by Rackspace) typically on 1GB slices. They are quick to
provision and the control panel / console / API is very good for management
& the support is very responsive to requests (e.g. for resizing).
Again it's DIY admin but they have some good tutorial posts for Linux
novices (including securing your slice).  Reckon on a few hours to install
the necessary packages (JDK, Tomcat, MySQL), configure iptables & exim,
deploy your war file etc.

However the pricing is no longer as competitive as it once was @ $70 pcm for
a 1GB slice + $15 pcm for snapshot backups. Rackspace Cloud is billed hourly
- estimated at $43.80 month for 1GB.

In our case, most of the slices & OS packages have been centrally
configuration managed (from Puppet), backed up (file-level using BackupPC)
and monitored (using Opsview).

I'd used mor.ph ages ago for a hobby project (was frustrating having to
redeploy) and had been considering Amazon micro and now elastic beanstalk
for the next one...

Robin

----
Twitter: @rbramley
Blog: http://leanjavaengineering.wordpress.com

--
View this message in context: http://grails.1312388.n4.nabble.com/Advise-on-hosting-tp3276494p3297116.html
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Re: Advise on hosting

rbramley
Lucas F. A. Teixeira wrote
We can go even further here...

People are discussing two different services here. Just infrastructure,
witch is what slicehost, amazon (pure amazon instances), rackspace, enjoyvps
and others does. But when you need the infrastructure to run the
application, and don't even want to get inside the infra, configure it and
others, now we're talking about plataforms of deployment and management.
This is what Beanstalk, Scalr, CloudFoundry and others does :)

[]s,


Lucas Frare Teixeira .·.
- lucastex@gmail.com
- lucastex.com.br
- blog.lucastex.com
- twitter.com/lucastex
Yes - the former VPS camp is IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service) and the latter is PaaS (Platform as a Service). I've been advocating the shift to PaaS for a while so that businesses can focus on their business requirements rather than the supporting infrastructure. Give it a few years for cloud platform management APIs to standardise and gain tooling support then it'll be a no-brainer to use PaaS.

At present, the choice isn't always clear cut as it depends upon the circumstances and non-functional requirements.
For client work where we're operating & supporting the Grails application to a defined Service Level Agreement we've used IaaS (Slicehost) so we can have more control over the service (albeit with outsourced virtualised hardware on a resilient platform) with operational flexibility & visibility.
For hobby projects - I can do without the hassle of maintaining OS patches etc. so I'd prefer PaaS.

Cheers,

Robin

----
Twitter: @rbramley
Blog: http://leanjavaengineering.wordpress.com

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Re: Advise on hosting

Dean Del Ponte-2
How would one configure and deploy their grails app in elastic beanstalk to utilize a database?

If anyone has a link to more info, that would be great.

Thanks,

Dean Del Ponte

On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 6:49 AM, rbramley <[hidden email]> wrote:


Lucas F. A. Teixeira wrote:
>
> We can go even further here...
>
> People are discussing two different services here. Just infrastructure,
> witch is what slicehost, amazon (pure amazon instances), rackspace,
> enjoyvps
> and others does. But when you need the infrastructure to run the
> application, and don't even want to get inside the infra, configure it and
> others, now we're talking about plataforms of deployment and management.
> This is what Beanstalk, Scalr, CloudFoundry and others does :)
>
> []s,
>
>
> Lucas Frare Teixeira .·.
> - [hidden email]
> - lucastex.com.br
> - blog.lucastex.com
> - twitter.com/lucastex
>

Yes - the former VPS camp is IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service) and the
latter is PaaS (Platform as a Service). I've been advocating the shift to
PaaS for a while so that businesses can focus on their business requirements
rather than the supporting infrastructure. Give it a few years for cloud
platform management APIs to standardise and gain tooling support then it'll
be a no-brainer to use PaaS.

At present, the choice isn't always clear cut as it depends upon the
circumstances and non-functional requirements.
For client work where we're operating & supporting the Grails application to
a defined Service Level Agreement we've used IaaS (Slicehost) so we can have
more control over the service (albeit with outsourced virtualised hardware
on a resilient platform) with operational flexibility & visibility.
For hobby projects - I can do without the hassle of maintaining OS patches
etc. so I'd prefer PaaS.

Cheers,

Robin

----
Twitter: @rbramley
Blog: http://leanjavaengineering.wordpress.com


--
View this message in context: http://grails.1312388.n4.nabble.com/Advise-on-hosting-tp3276494p3297171.html
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Re: Advise on hosting

Tom Gullo
In reply to this post by burtbeckwith
I didn't even know about beanstalk. It seems like a Heroku service for Java
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Re: Advise on hosting

tomas lin
In reply to this post by Dean Del Ponte-2
As mentioned before, you would either set up your own database in
another instance or use RDS - http://aws.amazon.com/rds/



On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 1:04 PM, Dean Del Ponte <[hidden email]> wrote:

> How would one configure and deploy their grails app in elastic beanstalk to
> utilize a database?
> If anyone has a link to more info, that would be great.
> Thanks,
> Dean Del Ponte
> On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 6:49 AM, rbramley <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>>
>> Lucas F. A. Teixeira wrote:
>> >
>> > We can go even further here...
>> >
>> > People are discussing two different services here. Just infrastructure,
>> > witch is what slicehost, amazon (pure amazon instances), rackspace,
>> > enjoyvps
>> > and others does. But when you need the infrastructure to run the
>> > application, and don't even want to get inside the infra, configure it
>> > and
>> > others, now we're talking about plataforms of deployment and management.
>> > This is what Beanstalk, Scalr, CloudFoundry and others does :)
>> >
>> > []s,
>> >
>> >
>> > Lucas Frare Teixeira .·.
>> > - [hidden email]
>> > - lucastex.com.br
>> > - blog.lucastex.com
>> > - twitter.com/lucastex
>> >
>>
>> Yes - the former VPS camp is IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service) and the
>> latter is PaaS (Platform as a Service). I've been advocating the shift to
>> PaaS for a while so that businesses can focus on their business
>> requirements
>> rather than the supporting infrastructure. Give it a few years for cloud
>> platform management APIs to standardise and gain tooling support then
>> it'll
>> be a no-brainer to use PaaS.
>>
>> At present, the choice isn't always clear cut as it depends upon the
>> circumstances and non-functional requirements.
>> For client work where we're operating & supporting the Grails application
>> to
>> a defined Service Level Agreement we've used IaaS (Slicehost) so we can
>> have
>> more control over the service (albeit with outsourced virtualised hardware
>> on a resilient platform) with operational flexibility & visibility.
>> For hobby projects - I can do without the hassle of maintaining OS patches
>> etc. so I'd prefer PaaS.
>>
>> Cheers,
>>
>> Robin
>>
>> ----
>> Twitter: @rbramley
>> Blog: http://leanjavaengineering.wordpress.com
>>
>>
>> --
>> View this message in context:
>> http://grails.1312388.n4.nabble.com/Advise-on-hosting-tp3276494p3297171.html
>> Sent from the Grails - user mailing list archive at Nabble.com.
>>
>> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
>> To unsubscribe from this list, please visit:
>>
>>    http://xircles.codehaus.org/manage_email
>>
>>
>
>

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Re: Advise on hosting

Groovy Comley
I've been following this thread with great interest as I'm about to start setting up a server. I am self confess noob when it comes to setting up servers but what I don't understand is the attraction to the amazon beanstalk way of doing it. Why the aversion to setting up a dedicated server?

I'm considering 

and I'm a little worried that I'm missing something here. Is this server with its handsome specs of AMD Athlon 64 X2 6000+ Dual Core with 6 GB of RAM not going to handle more then three people on it? 

Yes sometime down the line when my site is hugely popular I can consider dumping my db and moving to something a little bigger but should I not bother with this step and go straight to beanstalk?

Pretend that the money was the same for arguments sake. I'm less worried about the money and more worried about how much load a grails app running on these instances can handle.

Simon


On 9 February 2011 16:15, Tomas Lin <[hidden email]> wrote:
As mentioned before, you would either set up your own database in
another instance or use RDS - http://aws.amazon.com/rds/



On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 1:04 PM, Dean Del Ponte <[hidden email]> wrote:
> How would one configure and deploy their grails app in elastic beanstalk to
> utilize a database?
> If anyone has a link to more info, that would be great.
> Thanks,
> Dean Del Ponte
> On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 6:49 AM, rbramley <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>>
>> Lucas F. A. Teixeira wrote:
>> >
>> > We can go even further here...
>> >
>> > People are discussing two different services here. Just infrastructure,
>> > witch is what slicehost, amazon (pure amazon instances), rackspace,
>> > enjoyvps
>> > and others does. But when you need the infrastructure to run the
>> > application, and don't even want to get inside the infra, configure it
>> > and
>> > others, now we're talking about plataforms of deployment and management.
>> > This is what Beanstalk, Scalr, CloudFoundry and others does :)
>> >
>> > []s,
>> >
>> >
>> > Lucas Frare Teixeira .·.
>> > - [hidden email]
>> > - lucastex.com.br
>> > - blog.lucastex.com
>> > - twitter.com/lucastex
>> >
>>
>> Yes - the former VPS camp is IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service) and the
>> latter is PaaS (Platform as a Service). I've been advocating the shift to
>> PaaS for a while so that businesses can focus on their business
>> requirements
>> rather than the supporting infrastructure. Give it a few years for cloud
>> platform management APIs to standardise and gain tooling support then
>> it'll
>> be a no-brainer to use PaaS.
>>
>> At present, the choice isn't always clear cut as it depends upon the
>> circumstances and non-functional requirements.
>> For client work where we're operating & supporting the Grails application
>> to
>> a defined Service Level Agreement we've used IaaS (Slicehost) so we can
>> have
>> more control over the service (albeit with outsourced virtualised hardware
>> on a resilient platform) with operational flexibility & visibility.
>> For hobby projects - I can do without the hassle of maintaining OS patches
>> etc. so I'd prefer PaaS.
>>
>> Cheers,
>>
>> Robin
>>
>> ----
>> Twitter: @rbramley
>> Blog: http://leanjavaengineering.wordpress.com
>>
>>
>> --
>> View this message in context:
>> http://grails.1312388.n4.nabble.com/Advise-on-hosting-tp3276494p3297171.html
>> Sent from the Grails - user mailing list archive at Nabble.com.
>>
>> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
>> To unsubscribe from this list, please visit:
>>
>>    http://xircles.codehaus.org/manage_email
>>
>>
>
>

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Re: Advise on hosting

lucastex
In reply to this post by tomas lin
Thats it.

Amazon even have a good paper around "databases and AWS":

http://aws.amazon.com/running_databases/

Even if you have your database outside amazon (dreamhost or other host), you can reach it like any other normal way, when trying to connect.

Beanstalk provides you a automatically added to your tomcat system variable JDBC_CONNECTION_STRING, that you can use in your code:

jdbcUrl = System.getProperty("JDBC_CONNECTION_STRING")

Using this, you can configure the same war to run in multiple beanstalk environments, each environment with its variable value poitnint to a different database.
Something like our environments { } closure..

more info on this var here: http://docs.amazonwebservices.com/elasticbeanstalk/latest/ug/index.html?using-features.managing.container.html

[]s,




Lucas Frare Teixeira .·.
- [hidden email]
- lucastex.com.br
- blog.lucastex.com
- twitter.com/lucastex


On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 12:15 PM, Tomas Lin <[hidden email]> wrote:
As mentioned before, you would either set up your own database in
another instance or use RDS - http://aws.amazon.com/rds/



On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 1:04 PM, Dean Del Ponte <[hidden email]> wrote:
> How would one configure and deploy their grails app in elastic beanstalk to
> utilize a database?
> If anyone has a link to more info, that would be great.
> Thanks,
> Dean Del Ponte
> On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 6:49 AM, rbramley <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>>
>> Lucas F. A. Teixeira wrote:
>> >
>> > We can go even further here...
>> >
>> > People are discussing two different services here. Just infrastructure,
>> > witch is what slicehost, amazon (pure amazon instances), rackspace,
>> > enjoyvps
>> > and others does. But when you need the infrastructure to run the
>> > application, and don't even want to get inside the infra, configure it
>> > and
>> > others, now we're talking about plataforms of deployment and management.
>> > This is what Beanstalk, Scalr, CloudFoundry and others does :)
>> >
>> > []s,
>> >
>> >
>> > Lucas Frare Teixeira .·.
>> > - [hidden email]
>> > - lucastex.com.br
>> > - blog.lucastex.com
>> > - twitter.com/lucastex
>> >
>>
>> Yes - the former VPS camp is IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service) and the
>> latter is PaaS (Platform as a Service). I've been advocating the shift to
>> PaaS for a while so that businesses can focus on their business
>> requirements
>> rather than the supporting infrastructure. Give it a few years for cloud
>> platform management APIs to standardise and gain tooling support then
>> it'll
>> be a no-brainer to use PaaS.
>>
>> At present, the choice isn't always clear cut as it depends upon the
>> circumstances and non-functional requirements.
>> For client work where we're operating & supporting the Grails application
>> to
>> a defined Service Level Agreement we've used IaaS (Slicehost) so we can
>> have
>> more control over the service (albeit with outsourced virtualised hardware
>> on a resilient platform) with operational flexibility & visibility.
>> For hobby projects - I can do without the hassle of maintaining OS patches
>> etc. so I'd prefer PaaS.
>>
>> Cheers,
>>
>> Robin
>>
>> ----
>> Twitter: @rbramley
>> Blog: http://leanjavaengineering.wordpress.com
>>
>>
>> --
>> View this message in context:
>> http://grails.1312388.n4.nabble.com/Advise-on-hosting-tp3276494p3297171.html
>> Sent from the Grails - user mailing list archive at Nabble.com.
>>
>> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
>> To unsubscribe from this list, please visit:
>>
>>    http://xircles.codehaus.org/manage_email
>>
>>
>
>

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Re: Advise on hosting

tomas lin
In reply to this post by Groovy Comley
Beanstalk is free for the first year if you are a new AWS user.

On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 2:33 PM, Groovy Comley <[hidden email]> wrote:

> I've been following this thread with great interest as I'm about to start
> setting up a server. I am self confess noob when it comes to setting up
> servers but what I don't understand is the attraction to the amazon
> beanstalk way of doing it. Why the aversion to setting up a dedicated
> server?
> I'm considering
> http://www.hetzner.de/en/hosting/produkte_managed/ms7000
> and I'm a little worried that I'm missing something here. Is this server
> with its handsome specs of AMD Athlon 64 X2 6000+ Dual Core with 6 GB of RAM
> not going to handle more then three people on it?
> Yes sometime down the line when my site is hugely popular I can consider
> dumping my db and moving to something a little bigger but should I not
> bother with this step and go straight to beanstalk?
> Pretend that the money was the same for arguments sake. I'm less worried
> about the money and more worried about how much load a grails app running on
> these instances can handle.
> Simon
>
> On 9 February 2011 16:15, Tomas Lin <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>> As mentioned before, you would either set up your own database in
>> another instance or use RDS - http://aws.amazon.com/rds/
>>
>>
>>
>> On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 1:04 PM, Dean Del Ponte <[hidden email]>
>> wrote:
>> > How would one configure and deploy their grails app in elastic beanstalk
>> > to
>> > utilize a database?
>> > If anyone has a link to more info, that would be great.
>> > Thanks,
>> > Dean Del Ponte
>> > On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 6:49 AM, rbramley <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> Lucas F. A. Teixeira wrote:
>> >> >
>> >> > We can go even further here...
>> >> >
>> >> > People are discussing two different services here. Just
>> >> > infrastructure,
>> >> > witch is what slicehost, amazon (pure amazon instances), rackspace,
>> >> > enjoyvps
>> >> > and others does. But when you need the infrastructure to run the
>> >> > application, and don't even want to get inside the infra, configure
>> >> > it
>> >> > and
>> >> > others, now we're talking about plataforms of deployment and
>> >> > management.
>> >> > This is what Beanstalk, Scalr, CloudFoundry and others does :)
>> >> >
>> >> > []s,
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> > Lucas Frare Teixeira .·.
>> >> > - [hidden email]
>> >> > - lucastex.com.br
>> >> > - blog.lucastex.com
>> >> > - twitter.com/lucastex
>> >> >
>> >>
>> >> Yes - the former VPS camp is IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service) and the
>> >> latter is PaaS (Platform as a Service). I've been advocating the shift
>> >> to
>> >> PaaS for a while so that businesses can focus on their business
>> >> requirements
>> >> rather than the supporting infrastructure. Give it a few years for
>> >> cloud
>> >> platform management APIs to standardise and gain tooling support then
>> >> it'll
>> >> be a no-brainer to use PaaS.
>> >>
>> >> At present, the choice isn't always clear cut as it depends upon the
>> >> circumstances and non-functional requirements.
>> >> For client work where we're operating & supporting the Grails
>> >> application
>> >> to
>> >> a defined Service Level Agreement we've used IaaS (Slicehost) so we can
>> >> have
>> >> more control over the service (albeit with outsourced virtualised
>> >> hardware
>> >> on a resilient platform) with operational flexibility & visibility.
>> >> For hobby projects - I can do without the hassle of maintaining OS
>> >> patches
>> >> etc. so I'd prefer PaaS.
>> >>
>> >> Cheers,
>> >>
>> >> Robin
>> >>
>> >> ----
>> >> Twitter: @rbramley
>> >> Blog: http://leanjavaengineering.wordpress.com
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> --
>> >> View this message in context:
>> >>
>> >> http://grails.1312388.n4.nabble.com/Advise-on-hosting-tp3276494p3297171.html
>> >> Sent from the Grails - user mailing list archive at Nabble.com.
>> >>
>> >> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
>> >> To unsubscribe from this list, please visit:
>> >>
>> >>    http://xircles.codehaus.org/manage_email
>> >>
>> >>
>> >
>> >
>>
>> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
>> To unsubscribe from this list, please visit:
>>
>>    http://xircles.codehaus.org/manage_email
>>
>>
>
>

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Re: Advise on hosting

craigburke
In reply to this post by burtbeckwith
If you're comfortable going the VPS route and setting and administering the server yourself, linode http://www.linode.com is also a great option.

I've used slicehost before, but linode's prices are a lot better (in line with enjoyvps) and you have a lot more flexibility in terms of setting up your machine (you can have differrent OS profiles on the same machine for example).

I haven't tried to upgrade the memory on my linode or anything like that but the process looks pretty simple.

Craig


On 02/08/2011 01:48 PM, Burt Beckwith wrote:
Absolutely not - 50MB isn't enough for much at all. That artificially low price just lures you to their site and when it fails miserably you upgrade to what they wanted you to pay in the first place. This would be true for all web apps but more so for Grails since it needs more memory than non-Groovy apps.

For the same price you can get a 512MB heap at http://www.enjoyvps.com/unmanaged-linux-openvz-vps/ or 1GB if you pay $19/month. I've been running a small Grails app in the 512MB plan for a while with no issues.

There's also the new Amazon Elastic Beanstalk which people seem to have had success running Grails with: http://aws.amazon.com/elasticbeanstalk/

Burt

Hi folks,

I was looking at creating a small web application (blogs and info just) and
was looking for some advise into the amount of JVM heap space i would
require for such an application?

Planet-hosting.net has a basic package with 50MB Heap Space.

Would this application run ok?

Thanks,
Stephen

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Web Developer | Web Designer
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Re: Advise on hosting

lucastex
In reply to this post by tomas lin
Actually, beanstalk using is free forever, you'll only pay for the AWS resources you use. The "beanstalk" product is just a tool to automatize ec2 instances creation and autoscaling.

You'll pay exactly the same that you would pay if you were running your own ec2 instances, connecting via ssh and deploying manually.

But, as Tomas said, yes, AWS services (in the free usage tier) are free for one year.
More info, http://aws.amazon.com/free

[]s,



Lucas Frare Teixeira .·.
- [hidden email]
- lucastex.com.br
- blog.lucastex.com
- twitter.com/lucastex


On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 12:46 PM, Tomas Lin <[hidden email]> wrote:
Beanstalk is free for the first year if you are a new AWS user.

On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 2:33 PM, Groovy Comley <[hidden email]> wrote:
> I've been following this thread with great interest as I'm about to start
> setting up a server. I am self confess noob when it comes to setting up
> servers but what I don't understand is the attraction to the amazon
> beanstalk way of doing it. Why the aversion to setting up a dedicated
> server?
> I'm considering
> http://www.hetzner.de/en/hosting/produkte_managed/ms7000
> and I'm a little worried that I'm missing something here. Is this server
> with its handsome specs of AMD Athlon 64 X2 6000+ Dual Core with 6 GB of RAM
> not going to handle more then three people on it?
> Yes sometime down the line when my site is hugely popular I can consider
> dumping my db and moving to something a little bigger but should I not
> bother with this step and go straight to beanstalk?
> Pretend that the money was the same for arguments sake. I'm less worried
> about the money and more worried about how much load a grails app running on
> these instances can handle.
> Simon
>
> On 9 February 2011 16:15, Tomas Lin <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>> As mentioned before, you would either set up your own database in
>> another instance or use RDS - http://aws.amazon.com/rds/
>>
>>
>>
>> On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 1:04 PM, Dean Del Ponte <[hidden email]>
>> wrote:
>> > How would one configure and deploy their grails app in elastic beanstalk
>> > to
>> > utilize a database?
>> > If anyone has a link to more info, that would be great.
>> > Thanks,
>> > Dean Del Ponte
>> > On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 6:49 AM, rbramley <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> Lucas F. A. Teixeira wrote:
>> >> >
>> >> > We can go even further here...
>> >> >
>> >> > People are discussing two different services here. Just
>> >> > infrastructure,
>> >> > witch is what slicehost, amazon (pure amazon instances), rackspace,
>> >> > enjoyvps
>> >> > and others does. But when you need the infrastructure to run the
>> >> > application, and don't even want to get inside the infra, configure
>> >> > it
>> >> > and
>> >> > others, now we're talking about plataforms of deployment and
>> >> > management.
>> >> > This is what Beanstalk, Scalr, CloudFoundry and others does :)
>> >> >
>> >> > []s,
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> > Lucas Frare Teixeira .·.
>> >> > - [hidden email]
>> >> > - lucastex.com.br
>> >> > - blog.lucastex.com
>> >> > - twitter.com/lucastex
>> >> >
>> >>
>> >> Yes - the former VPS camp is IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service) and the
>> >> latter is PaaS (Platform as a Service). I've been advocating the shift
>> >> to
>> >> PaaS for a while so that businesses can focus on their business
>> >> requirements
>> >> rather than the supporting infrastructure. Give it a few years for
>> >> cloud
>> >> platform management APIs to standardise and gain tooling support then
>> >> it'll
>> >> be a no-brainer to use PaaS.
>> >>
>> >> At present, the choice isn't always clear cut as it depends upon the
>> >> circumstances and non-functional requirements.
>> >> For client work where we're operating & supporting the Grails
>> >> application
>> >> to
>> >> a defined Service Level Agreement we've used IaaS (Slicehost) so we can
>> >> have
>> >> more control over the service (albeit with outsourced virtualised
>> >> hardware
>> >> on a resilient platform) with operational flexibility & visibility.
>> >> For hobby projects - I can do without the hassle of maintaining OS
>> >> patches
>> >> etc. so I'd prefer PaaS.
>> >>
>> >> Cheers,
>> >>
>> >> Robin
>> >>
>> >> ----
>> >> Twitter: @rbramley
>> >> Blog: http://leanjavaengineering.wordpress.com
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> --
>> >> View this message in context:
>> >>
>> >> http://grails.1312388.n4.nabble.com/Advise-on-hosting-tp3276494p3297171.html
>> >> Sent from the Grails - user mailing list archive at Nabble.com.
>> >>
>> >> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
>> >> To unsubscribe from this list, please visit:
>> >>
>> >>    http://xircles.codehaus.org/manage_email
>> >>
>> >>
>> >
>> >
>>
>> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
>> To unsubscribe from this list, please visit:
>>
>>    http://xircles.codehaus.org/manage_email
>>
>>
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Re: Advise on hosting

pledbrook
In reply to this post by lucastex
> Beanstalk provides you a automatically added to your tomcat system variable
> JDBC_CONNECTION_STRING, that you can use in your code:
>
> jdbcUrl = System.getProperty("JDBC_CONNECTION_STRING")

Gah! They keep referring to it as an environment variable, so I was
using System.getenv(). No wonder that wasn't working.

--
Peter Ledbrook
Grails Advocate
SpringSource - A Division of VMware

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Re: Advise on hosting

lucastex
haha... yeah...

Believe, that's why :)

You can find JDBC_CONNECTION_STRING in this message I sent:

http://grails.1312388.n4.nabble.com/AWS-Beanstalk-System-Properties-td3234793.html

[]s,


Lucas Frare Teixeira .·.
- [hidden email]
- lucastex.com.br
- blog.lucastex.com
- twitter.com/lucastex


On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 1:06 PM, Peter Ledbrook <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Beanstalk provides you a automatically added to your tomcat system variable
> JDBC_CONNECTION_STRING, that you can use in your code:
>
> jdbcUrl = System.getProperty("JDBC_CONNECTION_STRING")

Gah! They keep referring to it as an environment variable, so I was
using System.getenv(). No wonder that wasn't working.

--
Peter Ledbrook
Grails Advocate
SpringSource - A Division of VMware

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Re: Advise on hosting

tomas lin
To aid in this discussion, here is a talk by the guys at Taulia
comparing cloud options -

http://www.softwareinsane.com/2011/02/deploying-and-running-grails-in-cloud.html



On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 3:10 PM, Lucas F. A. Teixeira <[hidden email]> wrote:

> haha... yeah...
>
> Believe, that's why :)
>
> You can find JDBC_CONNECTION_STRING in this message I sent:
>
> http://grails.1312388.n4.nabble.com/AWS-Beanstalk-System-Properties-td3234793.html
>
> []s,
>
>
> Lucas Frare Teixeira .·.
> - [hidden email]
> - lucastex.com.br
> - blog.lucastex.com
> - twitter.com/lucastex
>
>
> On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 1:06 PM, Peter Ledbrook <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>>
>> > Beanstalk provides you a automatically added to your tomcat system
>> > variable
>> > JDBC_CONNECTION_STRING, that you can use in your code:
>> >
>> > jdbcUrl = System.getProperty("JDBC_CONNECTION_STRING")
>>
>> Gah! They keep referring to it as an environment variable, so I was
>> using System.getenv(). No wonder that wasn't working.
>>
>> --
>> Peter Ledbrook
>> Grails Advocate
>> SpringSource - A Division of VMware
>>
>> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
>> To unsubscribe from this list, please visit:
>>
>>    http://xircles.codehaus.org/manage_email
>>
>>
>
>

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Re: Advise on hosting

bkane
In reply to this post by pledbrook
Our app is currently using a jndi lookup to get the datasource, so the pooling, etc is done by Tomcat.  What is the right way to use this property in Grails/AWS/RDS so that I can have one war file to deploy to multiple environments?


On Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 10:06 AM, Peter Ledbrook <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Beanstalk provides you a automatically added to your tomcat system variable
> JDBC_CONNECTION_STRING, that you can use in your code:
>
> jdbcUrl = System.getProperty("JDBC_CONNECTION_STRING")

Gah! They keep referring to it as an environment variable, so I was
using System.getenv(). No wonder that wasn't working.

--
Peter Ledbrook
Grails Advocate
SpringSource - A Division of VMware

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Issue with ssl call

Peter Bell-5
In reply to this post by tomas lin
I know it's kind of a long shot, but I'm still wrangling with the Paypal adaptive payments API. I moved from my own implementation using http-builder to a java SDK (https://www.x.com/community/ppx/sdks#ADAPI) , but I'm getting the same error:

Error 500: Executing action [purchase] of controller [com.clientName.EventController] caused exception: com.paypal.platform.sdk.exception.FatalException: hostname in certificate didn't match: <216.113.191.96> != <svcs.sandbox.paypal.com>

The FatalException is just a catch/rethrow going on in the Paypal SDK for an underlying connection error.  The error I was getting before was a javax.net.ssl.SSLException with the same message string, so I'm guessing that's still the underlying error.

Just wondering if anyone has any first level thoughts on how to go about handling this?

Best Wishes,
Peter

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