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grails with Git or Svn

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grails with Git or Svn

svaens
Hi all, 

A question for those who use Git, or who have migrated to using Git from Svn:

I have been looking at doing so (migrating from svn to Git). 
I'm testing with a new project that doesn't yet exist in any version control system.

I've made it so far as to 
1. create the remote repo, 
2. clone the remote repo to a local copy, 
3. add the grails project to the local repo
4. add, commit, push (to upstream ..... i''m using EGit by the way)
5. delete the local lot, for testing purposes
6. clone again.... now I have it locally. 

But, there are a few things that are discouraging me now;

1. Git doesn't track folders (so, suddenly, those empty src folders I had (which might later be filled) have been lost.... and I have to delete them for now from the source list in the eclipse project settings.... just one extra item which suggests EGit is not up to the task
2. The first error I saw was not very obvious (as I was trying to push to the remote repo) ... it's gone now (but I don't know how or why). It was something about "egit Can't connect to any repository missing unknown" .... 
3. according to the doco for Egit 
there is the recommendation :  "Don't create the Repository within the Eclipse workspace"

This is all fine, I guess, and seems to the the default way the EGit handles cloning the remote repo (by default, placing it under $HOME/git/<repo_name>
yet, of course, now that I go to run my grails app from eclipse, it won't work (without some further tweaking) because the default run path is WORKSPACE/<PROJECT>
which doesn't exist, because EGit has placed the repo back in my home directory, and an import does not seem to make any sort of additional 'working copy'. 
I'm working directly on the repo ???? Weird!

I've got no one to get a view of what is 'best practice' here, as i'm not in a team, and i'm working alone, 

a)     How do people work around (1)
b)     How do people work around (3)
c)     Generally, what is the best way to use Git with Grails development ..... (i'm currently using STS, and prefer to remain doing so)
       in terms of setting up structure, 

Because, at it looks now, it all just seems (EGit at least) a bit flaky and difficult.. .complicated. 
And then I have to consider, is it anyway the best tool for me. I am pretty much a lone develop on this project, 
and I don't expect a large team to join in. Are there any real benefits to me using Git over Subversion (which I am very much used to).

I had hoped to start using it, partly because it is becoming more popular, and I thought i'd like to add one more thing to my skill set.
But not at the cost of the integrity of the project source, and the ease of use of my development environment. 

What are you doing? Anyone got any advise for me? Hints, tips?

Thanks in advance, 

sean











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Re: grails with Git or Svn

caiofbpa@gmail.com
Hello Sean!

Answering your questions:

a) Git doesn't keep empty folders by design, and this is a good thing. In a new clone, just run a "grails run-app" and those folders will be created automatically for you again. However, you can also add an empty file (touch ".somefile") into a folder and commit it, in order to Git track them (the file and the folder).

b) Use CLI to clone a repo.

c) I am really sure that CLI is the best way to use Git. But you can also use SourceTree, Git-Gui, GitK, Git-Box, XGit, TortoiseGit and other Graphic User Interfaces.

Well, you came from SVN. SVN leads us to think in a centralized way. In order to use Git, you should be used to a distributed way of managing repositories, so you would't feel weird by editing code 'inside' a repository. Git is more complicated than SVN, of course, but it worth its learning, believe me. You can start reading http://book.git-scm.com/ and the http://git-scm.com/course/svn.html may help you understand some differences from SVN.

A .gitignore specific for Grails development, in order to keep repo clean, is very recommended: https://github.com/github/gitignore/blob/master/Grails.gitignore

Cheers,

-- Caio

On Feb 6, 2012, at 5:18 AM, Sean Van Buggenum wrote:

Hi all, 

A question for those who use Git, or who have migrated to using Git from Svn:

I have been looking at doing so (migrating from svn to Git). 
I'm testing with a new project that doesn't yet exist in any version control system.

I've made it so far as to 
1. create the remote repo, 
2. clone the remote repo to a local copy, 
3. add the grails project to the local repo
4. add, commit, push (to upstream ..... i''m using EGit by the way)
5. delete the local lot, for testing purposes
6. clone again.... now I have it locally. 

But, there are a few things that are discouraging me now;

1. Git doesn't track folders (so, suddenly, those empty src folders I had (which might later be filled) have been lost.... and I have to delete them for now from the source list in the eclipse project settings.... just one extra item which suggests EGit is not up to the task
2. The first error I saw was not very obvious (as I was trying to push to the remote repo) ... it's gone now (but I don't know how or why). It was something about "egit Can't connect to any repository missing unknown" .... 
3. according to the doco for Egit 
there is the recommendation :  "Don't create the Repository within the Eclipse workspace"

This is all fine, I guess, and seems to the the default way the EGit handles cloning the remote repo (by default, placing it under $HOME/git/<repo_name>
yet, of course, now that I go to run my grails app from eclipse, it won't work (without some further tweaking) because the default run path is WORKSPACE/<PROJECT>
which doesn't exist, because EGit has placed the repo back in my home directory, and an import does not seem to make any sort of additional 'working copy'. 
I'm working directly on the repo ???? Weird!

I've got no one to get a view of what is 'best practice' here, as i'm not in a team, and i'm working alone, 

a)     How do people work around (1)
b)     How do people work around (3)
c)     Generally, what is the best way to use Git with Grails development ..... (i'm currently using STS, and prefer to remain doing so)
       in terms of setting up structure, 

Because, at it looks now, it all just seems (EGit at least) a bit flaky and difficult.. .complicated. 
And then I have to consider, is it anyway the best tool for me. I am pretty much a lone develop on this project, 
and I don't expect a large team to join in. Are there any real benefits to me using Git over Subversion (which I am very much used to).

I had hoped to start using it, partly because it is becoming more popular, and I thought i'd like to add one more thing to my skill set.
But not at the cost of the integrity of the project source, and the ease of use of my development environment. 

What are you doing? Anyone got any advise for me? Hints, tips?

Thanks in advance, 

sean












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Re: grails with Git or Svn

rlovtangen

On Feb 6, 2012, at 11:19 AM, Caio Fernando Bertoldi Paes de Andrade wrote:

Hello Sean!

Answering your questions:

a) Git doesn't keep empty folders by design, and this is a good thing. In a new clone, just run a "grails run-app" and those folders will be created automatically for you again. However, you can also add an empty file (touch ".somefile") into a folder and commit it, in order to Git track them (the file and the folder).

Well, if that's a good thing is discussable. I remember back in the old days of moving from CVS to SVN how happy we were to get rid of those stupid empty files.


b) Use CLI to clone a repo.

c) I am really sure that CLI is the best way to use Git. But you can also use SourceTree, Git-Gui, GitK, Git-Box, XGit, TortoiseGit and other Graphic User Interfaces.

Well, you came from SVN. SVN leads us to think in a centralized way. In order to use Git, you should be used to a distributed way of managing repositories, so you would't feel weird by editing code 'inside' a repository. Git is more complicated than SVN, of course, but it worth its learning, believe me. You can start reading http://book.git-scm.com/ and the http://git-scm.com/course/svn.html may help you understand some differences from SVN.

A .gitignore specific for Grails development, in order to keep repo clean, is very recommended: https://github.com/github/gitignore/blob/master/Grails.gitignore

Cheers,

-- Caio

On Feb 6, 2012, at 5:18 AM, Sean Van Buggenum wrote:

Hi all, 

A question for those who use Git, or who have migrated to using Git from Svn:

I have been looking at doing so (migrating from svn to Git). 
I'm testing with a new project that doesn't yet exist in any version control system.

I've made it so far as to 
1. create the remote repo, 
2. clone the remote repo to a local copy, 
3. add the grails project to the local repo
4. add, commit, push (to upstream ..... i''m using EGit by the way)
5. delete the local lot, for testing purposes
6. clone again.... now I have it locally. 

But, there are a few things that are discouraging me now;

1. Git doesn't track folders (so, suddenly, those empty src folders I had (which might later be filled) have been lost.... and I have to delete them for now from the source list in the eclipse project settings.... just one extra item which suggests EGit is not up to the task
2. The first error I saw was not very obvious (as I was trying to push to the remote repo) ... it's gone now (but I don't know how or why). It was something about "egit Can't connect to any repository missing unknown" .... 
3. according to the doco for Egit 
there is the recommendation :  "Don't create the Repository within the Eclipse workspace"

This is all fine, I guess, and seems to the the default way the EGit handles cloning the remote repo (by default, placing it under $HOME/git/<repo_name>
yet, of course, now that I go to run my grails app from eclipse, it won't work (without some further tweaking) because the default run path is WORKSPACE/<PROJECT>
which doesn't exist, because EGit has placed the repo back in my home directory, and an import does not seem to make any sort of additional 'working copy'. 
I'm working directly on the repo ???? Weird!

I've got no one to get a view of what is 'best practice' here, as i'm not in a team, and i'm working alone, 

a)     How do people work around (1)
b)     How do people work around (3)
c)     Generally, what is the best way to use Git with Grails development ..... (i'm currently using STS, and prefer to remain doing so)
       in terms of setting up structure, 

Because, at it looks now, it all just seems (EGit at least) a bit flaky and difficult.. .complicated. 
And then I have to consider, is it anyway the best tool for me. I am pretty much a lone develop on this project, 
and I don't expect a large team to join in. Are there any real benefits to me using Git over Subversion (which I am very much used to).

I had hoped to start using it, partly because it is becoming more popular, and I thought i'd like to add one more thing to my skill set.
But not at the cost of the integrity of the project source, and the ease of use of my development environment. 

What are you doing? Anyone got any advise for me? Hints, tips?

Thanks in advance, 

sean













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Re: grails with Git or Svn

caiofbpa@gmail.com
IMHO, keeping empty folders (and empty files) isn't a good practice.

So, I strongly recommend to don't add those empty files, don't worry about the absence of empty folders, since Grails can recreate those empty folders when you run "grails clean" or "grails run-app".

But, If you need/want to have those empty folders into repo, adding an empty file is a WORKAROUND.

I thought I was clear in my previous post, so sorry if I wasn't.

-- Caio

On Feb 6, 2012, at 8:56 AM, Ronny Løvtangen wrote:


On Feb 6, 2012, at 11:19 AM, Caio Fernando Bertoldi Paes de Andrade wrote:

Hello Sean!

Answering your questions:

a) Git doesn't keep empty folders by design, and this is a good thing. In a new clone, just run a "grails run-app" and those folders will be created automatically for you again. However, you can also add an empty file (touch ".somefile") into a folder and commit it, in order to Git track them (the file and the folder).

Well, if that's a good thing is discussable. I remember back in the old days of moving from CVS to SVN how happy we were to get rid of those stupid empty files.


b) Use CLI to clone a repo.

c) I am really sure that CLI is the best way to use Git. But you can also use SourceTree, Git-Gui, GitK, Git-Box, XGit, TortoiseGit and other Graphic User Interfaces.

Well, you came from SVN. SVN leads us to think in a centralized way. In order to use Git, you should be used to a distributed way of managing repositories, so you would't feel weird by editing code 'inside' a repository. Git is more complicated than SVN, of course, but it worth its learning, believe me. You can start reading http://book.git-scm.com/ and the http://git-scm.com/course/svn.html may help you understand some differences from SVN.

A .gitignore specific for Grails development, in order to keep repo clean, is very recommended: https://github.com/github/gitignore/blob/master/Grails.gitignore

Cheers,

-- Caio

On Feb 6, 2012, at 5:18 AM, Sean Van Buggenum wrote:

Hi all, 

A question for those who use Git, or who have migrated to using Git from Svn:

I have been looking at doing so (migrating from svn to Git). 
I'm testing with a new project that doesn't yet exist in any version control system.

I've made it so far as to 
1. create the remote repo, 
2. clone the remote repo to a local copy, 
3. add the grails project to the local repo
4. add, commit, push (to upstream ..... i''m using EGit by the way)
5. delete the local lot, for testing purposes
6. clone again.... now I have it locally. 

But, there are a few things that are discouraging me now;

1. Git doesn't track folders (so, suddenly, those empty src folders I had (which might later be filled) have been lost.... and I have to delete them for now from the source list in the eclipse project settings.... just one extra item which suggests EGit is not up to the task
2. The first error I saw was not very obvious (as I was trying to push to the remote repo) ... it's gone now (but I don't know how or why). It was something about "egit Can't connect to any repository missing unknown" .... 
3. according to the doco for Egit 
there is the recommendation :  "Don't create the Repository within the Eclipse workspace"

This is all fine, I guess, and seems to the the default way the EGit handles cloning the remote repo (by default, placing it under $HOME/git/<repo_name>
yet, of course, now that I go to run my grails app from eclipse, it won't work (without some further tweaking) because the default run path is WORKSPACE/<PROJECT>
which doesn't exist, because EGit has placed the repo back in my home directory, and an import does not seem to make any sort of additional 'working copy'. 
I'm working directly on the repo ???? Weird!

I've got no one to get a view of what is 'best practice' here, as i'm not in a team, and i'm working alone, 

a)     How do people work around (1)
b)     How do people work around (3)
c)     Generally, what is the best way to use Git with Grails development ..... (i'm currently using STS, and prefer to remain doing so)
       in terms of setting up structure, 

Because, at it looks now, it all just seems (EGit at least) a bit flaky and difficult.. .complicated. 
And then I have to consider, is it anyway the best tool for me. I am pretty much a lone develop on this project, 
and I don't expect a large team to join in. Are there any real benefits to me using Git over Subversion (which I am very much used to).

I had hoped to start using it, partly because it is becoming more popular, and I thought i'd like to add one more thing to my skill set.
But not at the cost of the integrity of the project source, and the ease of use of my development environment. 

What are you doing? Anyone got any advise for me? Hints, tips?

Thanks in advance, 

sean














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Re: grails with Git or Svn

rlovtangen
Then I guess you also mean it's bad practice by 'grails create-app' to create those empty folders in the first place? I strongly disagree. While git is fantastic in many ways, I think it's very inconvenient the way git handles this.

Ronny

On Feb 6, 2012, at 12:47 PM, Caio Fernando Bertoldi Paes de Andrade wrote:

IMHO, keeping empty folders (and empty files) isn't a good practice.

So, I strongly recommend to don't add those empty files, don't worry about the absence of empty folders, since Grails can recreate those empty folders when you run "grails clean" or "grails run-app".

But, If you need/want to have those empty folders into repo, adding an empty file is a WORKAROUND.

I thought I was clear in my previous post, so sorry if I wasn't.

-- Caio

On Feb 6, 2012, at 8:56 AM, Ronny Løvtangen wrote:


On Feb 6, 2012, at 11:19 AM, Caio Fernando Bertoldi Paes de Andrade wrote:

Hello Sean!

Answering your questions:

a) Git doesn't keep empty folders by design, and this is a good thing. In a new clone, just run a "grails run-app" and those folders will be created automatically for you again. However, you can also add an empty file (touch ".somefile") into a folder and commit it, in order to Git track them (the file and the folder).

Well, if that's a good thing is discussable. I remember back in the old days of moving from CVS to SVN how happy we were to get rid of those stupid empty files.


b) Use CLI to clone a repo.

c) I am really sure that CLI is the best way to use Git. But you can also use SourceTree, Git-Gui, GitK, Git-Box, XGit, TortoiseGit and other Graphic User Interfaces.

Well, you came from SVN. SVN leads us to think in a centralized way. In order to use Git, you should be used to a distributed way of managing repositories, so you would't feel weird by editing code 'inside' a repository. Git is more complicated than SVN, of course, but it worth its learning, believe me. You can start reading http://book.git-scm.com/ and the http://git-scm.com/course/svn.html may help you understand some differences from SVN.

A .gitignore specific for Grails development, in order to keep repo clean, is very recommended: https://github.com/github/gitignore/blob/master/Grails.gitignore

Cheers,

-- Caio

On Feb 6, 2012, at 5:18 AM, Sean Van Buggenum wrote:

Hi all, 

A question for those who use Git, or who have migrated to using Git from Svn:

I have been looking at doing so (migrating from svn to Git). 
I'm testing with a new project that doesn't yet exist in any version control system.

I've made it so far as to 
1. create the remote repo, 
2. clone the remote repo to a local copy, 
3. add the grails project to the local repo
4. add, commit, push (to upstream ..... i''m using EGit by the way)
5. delete the local lot, for testing purposes
6. clone again.... now I have it locally. 

But, there are a few things that are discouraging me now;

1. Git doesn't track folders (so, suddenly, those empty src folders I had (which might later be filled) have been lost.... and I have to delete them for now from the source list in the eclipse project settings.... just one extra item which suggests EGit is not up to the task
2. The first error I saw was not very obvious (as I was trying to push to the remote repo) ... it's gone now (but I don't know how or why). It was something about "egit Can't connect to any repository missing unknown" .... 
3. according to the doco for Egit 
there is the recommendation :  "Don't create the Repository within the Eclipse workspace"

This is all fine, I guess, and seems to the the default way the EGit handles cloning the remote repo (by default, placing it under $HOME/git/<repo_name>
yet, of course, now that I go to run my grails app from eclipse, it won't work (without some further tweaking) because the default run path is WORKSPACE/<PROJECT>
which doesn't exist, because EGit has placed the repo back in my home directory, and an import does not seem to make any sort of additional 'working copy'. 
I'm working directly on the repo ???? Weird!

I've got no one to get a view of what is 'best practice' here, as i'm not in a team, and i'm working alone, 

a)     How do people work around (1)
b)     How do people work around (3)
c)     Generally, what is the best way to use Git with Grails development ..... (i'm currently using STS, and prefer to remain doing so)
       in terms of setting up structure, 

Because, at it looks now, it all just seems (EGit at least) a bit flaky and difficult.. .complicated. 
And then I have to consider, is it anyway the best tool for me. I am pretty much a lone develop on this project, 
and I don't expect a large team to join in. Are there any real benefits to me using Git over Subversion (which I am very much used to).

I had hoped to start using it, partly because it is becoming more popular, and I thought i'd like to add one more thing to my skill set.
But not at the cost of the integrity of the project source, and the ease of use of my development environment. 

What are you doing? Anyone got any advise for me? Hints, tips?

Thanks in advance, 

sean















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Re: grails with Git or Svn

caiofbpa@gmail.com
No, absolutely. In a development environment, working directory, you might need those folders to put code into them.
But is really useless to have an empty folder into a repository, a empty folder does not represent a substantial change, since it should have no impact on application's operation.

-- Caio

On Feb 6, 2012, at 10:01 AM, Ronny Løvtangen wrote:

Then I guess you also mean it's bad practice by 'grails create-app' to create those empty folders in the first place? I strongly disagree. While git is fantastic in many ways, I think it's very inconvenient the way git handles this.

Ronny

On Feb 6, 2012, at 12:47 PM, Caio Fernando Bertoldi Paes de Andrade wrote:

IMHO, keeping empty folders (and empty files) isn't a good practice.

So, I strongly recommend to don't add those empty files, don't worry about the absence of empty folders, since Grails can recreate those empty folders when you run "grails clean" or "grails run-app".

But, If you need/want to have those empty folders into repo, adding an empty file is a WORKAROUND.

I thought I was clear in my previous post, so sorry if I wasn't.

-- Caio

On Feb 6, 2012, at 8:56 AM, Ronny Løvtangen wrote:


On Feb 6, 2012, at 11:19 AM, Caio Fernando Bertoldi Paes de Andrade wrote:

Hello Sean!

Answering your questions:

a) Git doesn't keep empty folders by design, and this is a good thing. In a new clone, just run a "grails run-app" and those folders will be created automatically for you again. However, you can also add an empty file (touch ".somefile") into a folder and commit it, in order to Git track them (the file and the folder).

Well, if that's a good thing is discussable. I remember back in the old days of moving from CVS to SVN how happy we were to get rid of those stupid empty files.


b) Use CLI to clone a repo.

c) I am really sure that CLI is the best way to use Git. But you can also use SourceTree, Git-Gui, GitK, Git-Box, XGit, TortoiseGit and other Graphic User Interfaces.

Well, you came from SVN. SVN leads us to think in a centralized way. In order to use Git, you should be used to a distributed way of managing repositories, so you would't feel weird by editing code 'inside' a repository. Git is more complicated than SVN, of course, but it worth its learning, believe me. You can start reading http://book.git-scm.com/ and the http://git-scm.com/course/svn.html may help you understand some differences from SVN.

A .gitignore specific for Grails development, in order to keep repo clean, is very recommended: https://github.com/github/gitignore/blob/master/Grails.gitignore

Cheers,

-- Caio

On Feb 6, 2012, at 5:18 AM, Sean Van Buggenum wrote:

Hi all, 

A question for those who use Git, or who have migrated to using Git from Svn:

I have been looking at doing so (migrating from svn to Git). 
I'm testing with a new project that doesn't yet exist in any version control system.

I've made it so far as to 
1. create the remote repo, 
2. clone the remote repo to a local copy, 
3. add the grails project to the local repo
4. add, commit, push (to upstream ..... i''m using EGit by the way)
5. delete the local lot, for testing purposes
6. clone again.... now I have it locally. 

But, there are a few things that are discouraging me now;

1. Git doesn't track folders (so, suddenly, those empty src folders I had (which might later be filled) have been lost.... and I have to delete them for now from the source list in the eclipse project settings.... just one extra item which suggests EGit is not up to the task
2. The first error I saw was not very obvious (as I was trying to push to the remote repo) ... it's gone now (but I don't know how or why). It was something about "egit Can't connect to any repository missing unknown" .... 
3. according to the doco for Egit 
there is the recommendation :  "Don't create the Repository within the Eclipse workspace"

This is all fine, I guess, and seems to the the default way the EGit handles cloning the remote repo (by default, placing it under $HOME/git/<repo_name>
yet, of course, now that I go to run my grails app from eclipse, it won't work (without some further tweaking) because the default run path is WORKSPACE/<PROJECT>
which doesn't exist, because EGit has placed the repo back in my home directory, and an import does not seem to make any sort of additional 'working copy'. 
I'm working directly on the repo ???? Weird!

I've got no one to get a view of what is 'best practice' here, as i'm not in a team, and i'm working alone, 

a)     How do people work around (1)
b)     How do people work around (3)
c)     Generally, what is the best way to use Git with Grails development ..... (i'm currently using STS, and prefer to remain doing so)
       in terms of setting up structure, 

Because, at it looks now, it all just seems (EGit at least) a bit flaky and difficult.. .complicated. 
And then I have to consider, is it anyway the best tool for me. I am pretty much a lone develop on this project, 
and I don't expect a large team to join in. Are there any real benefits to me using Git over Subversion (which I am very much used to).

I had hoped to start using it, partly because it is becoming more popular, and I thought i'd like to add one more thing to my skill set.
But not at the cost of the integrity of the project source, and the ease of use of my development environment. 

What are you doing? Anyone got any advise for me? Hints, tips?

Thanks in advance, 

sean
















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Re: grails with Git or Svn

pledbrook
In reply to this post by svaens
> I've got no one to get a view of what is 'best practice' here, as i'm not in
> a team, and i'm working alone,
>
> a)     How do people work around (1)
> b)     How do people work around (3)

All of my projects are outside of the Eclipse workspace. The workspace
simply contains the Eclipse/STS-specific bits.

> c)     Generally, what is the best way to use Git with Grails development
> ..... (i'm currently using STS, and prefer to remain doing so)
>        in terms of setting up structure,

It seems the best approach is to create your Grails projects outside
of the workspace and create the initial git repository where your
project is. Then add the project to the workspace.

> Because, at it looks now, it all just seems (EGit at least) a bit flaky and
> difficult.. .complicated.
> And then I have to consider, is it anyway the best tool for me. I am pretty
> much a lone develop on this project,
> and I don't expect a large team to join in. Are there any real benefits to
> me using Git over Subversion (which I am very much used to).

If you're the sole developer, the fact you can have your own local
repository is a big win. You get all the history and rollback features
from source control but don't need any remote hosting. The biggest
benefit is the ease of branching and merging. And yes, this is a
benefit to sole developers as well as teams.

It takes a while to get used to git if you're coming from Subversion,
but once you get the hang of it you won't be able to go back.

Hope that helps,

Peter

--
Peter Ledbrook
Grails Advocate
SpringSource - A Division of VMware

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Re: grails with Git or Svn

John Fletcher-3
In reply to this post by svaens
2012/2/6 Sean Van Buggenum <[hidden email]>
1. Git doesn't track folders (so, suddenly, those empty src folders I had (which might later be filled) have been lost.... and I have to delete them for now from the source list in the eclipse project settings.... just one extra item which suggests EGit is not up to the task
 
 
Interestingly Rails automatically adds an empty file called .gitkeep to all empty folders, this would be an option for you. Whether or not Git should accept empty folders, the fact remains that it doesn't, and that these folders are actually an essential part of Grails' user friendliness / design by example. So maybe Grails should do something similar, or at least do it as a result of the command integrate-with git.
 
 
3. according to the doco for Egit 
there is the recommendation :  "Don't create the Repository within the Eclipse workspace"
 
Thanks for this - it was news to me. I didn't know they recommended that and I in fact have my git repositories in the workspace. Reading the logic behind their recommendation I was struck by the fact that it doesn't actually make sense. It's all based on the idea that you will have one repository with multiple/all projects in it, whereas I think the defacto way to use git is "one repository per project", in which case everything works fine. I can't say that my way is the best practice, but it's an option.
 Are there any real benefits to me using Git over Subversion (which I am very much used to).
I had hoped to start using it, partly because it is becoming more popular, and I thought i'd like to add one more thing to my skill set.
But not at the cost of the integrity of the project source, and the ease of use of my development environment. 
 
Git is not necessarily better than Subversion for you, there is always a certain amount of hype in such things. All the cool kids are using it. Sometimes what you actually really need to do right now is start writing code for your new project, not fight with SCM. You can always migrate later. That said, I think if you can get over this initial hurdle of setup and basic usage then you won't suffer ongoing problems, and it sounds like you're well on your way. A major point is that if you want to make any contributions to open source projects, you should learn git because inevitably at least one of them will be on github. Like Grails. In the end it's probably worth learning just because of the momentum behind it - sooner or later you will have to use it.
 
John
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Re: grails with Git or Svn

wilsonaikeda@gmail.com
• Git is fast, really fast
• Git repos are small than other vcs, commits are not deltas but are snapshots of your entire project
• With svn you got a lot of .svn folders inside your project folders
• With git you can commit or rollback offline
• Your coworker doesn't need to commit to the repository in order for you to get his commit, you pull directly from him
• Git merges are more easy to do than svn merges
And if you prefer to work like svn (central repository) you can use gitolite or gitosis
• All your files are checksummed using sha-1

There's one youtube video with the penguin king talking about git on google hq (he likes to talk about how he hates cvs...and svn, oh yeah everything that isn't linux)

On Feb 8, 2012, at 12:07 AM, John Fletcher wrote:

Are there any real benefits to me using Git over Subversion (which I am very much used to).
I had hoped to start using it, partly because it is becoming more popular, and I thought i'd like to add one more thing to my skill set.
But not at the cost of the integrity of the project source, and the ease of use of my development environment. 

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Re: grails with Git or Svn

Ian Roberts
On 07/02/2012 17:45, Akira Ikeda wrote:
> • With svn you got a lot of .svn folders inside your project folders

Not in svn 1.7, that uses a single .svn at the top level in the same way
as git would.

Ian

P.S. ... which makes a mess of one of my projects that looks for a .svn
directory to know whether the folder it's looking at was checked out
from svn :-(

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Re: grails with Git or Svn

Matthias Hryniszak
My 3 cents:

if you're used to subversion and if it is working just fine for you and if you have a pristine connection to the server and if you like the way merges are being done in subversion and you don't really plan on doing open-source software - stick with it. There's nothing wrong with Subversion. It does what it does the way it does. I've been a Subversion coach for like 5 years and I liked it way better than ClearCase...

But if you're sick and tired of merges going sideways, you hate the fact that your repository is miles away with a 50kbps connection over God knows what, if you hate the fact that blaming and viewing history of a file isn't something you can actually do due to the damn slow connection you have - go ahead, spend some time with Git. Create a GitHub account, maybe a BitBucket account too. Make some repositories, clone them,... Get the feel of what it means being disconnected and free from the ever growing frustration on how slow that damn thing was.

Maybe Mercurial (Hg) would be something closer to your heart. I know it was for me at the beginning. I found it very attractive due to the fact that most of the actual commands are identical to their Subversion counterparts. The "repository" part that Akira mentioned is comparable between Git and Hg, Hg is extremely fast (almost as fast as Git) and in general it is a very nice piece of software.

At the end of the day it is just a tool - it's how you use it that makes the biggest difference.


Matthias.

2012/2/7 Ian Roberts <[hidden email]>
On 07/02/2012 17:45, Akira Ikeda wrote:
> • With svn you got a lot of .svn folders inside your project folders

Not in svn 1.7, that uses a single .svn at the top level in the same way
as git would.

Ian

P.S. ... which makes a mess of one of my projects that looks for a .svn
directory to know whether the folder it's looking at was checked out
from svn :-(

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[hidden email]  | University of Sheffield, UK

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Re: grails with Git or Svn

rlovtangen
In reply to this post by wilsonaikeda@gmail.com

On Feb 7, 2012, at 6:45 PM, Akira Ikeda wrote:

> • Git is fast, really fast

That's true. But to be honest, I haven't really noticed the difference. There's also some major speed improvements in Subversion 1.7 (known as  HTTPv2, which removes the WebDAV support performance overhead).
If you're working over a slow connection, though, Git would beat subversion big time on speed.

> • Git repos are small than other vcs, commits are not deltas but are snapshots of your entire project

Also true, but who cares about a few extra megabytes on the server. What matters more is probably the local clone / working copy. A subversion working copy is always twice as big as current version of all files. A git clone could be smaller or bigger, depending on the history. Sometimes much bigger, e.g. a git clone of grails-core is 277MB, while the size of current version of all files is just 24MB. So a Subversion working copy would be only 48MB. While I hate waiting 30 minutes for a git clone of grails-core to finish (Git is fast, but Github is quite slow), it's not something I do often. And even though the git clone is 277MB, it's only 0,5% of my laptops disk space, so I really don't care about the disk usage.

That being said, there's lots of other good reasons to choose Git. I wouldn't take speed or repo size into account when taking the choice. Features like offline commit and better merge tracking are more valid reasons to choose Git IMHO.
For open source projects it's really no alternative to stick with Subversion, that's an area where Git (or Mercurial og Bazaar) really shines.  


Ronny
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Re: grails with Git or Svn

rlovtangen
In reply to this post by Matthias Hryniszak
+1

On Feb 7, 2012, at 8:47 PM, Matthias Hryniszak wrote:

My 3 cents:

if you're used to subversion and if it is working just fine for you and if you have a pristine connection to the server and if you like the way merges are being done in subversion and you don't really plan on doing open-source software - stick with it. There's nothing wrong with Subversion. It does what it does the way it does. I've been a Subversion coach for like 5 years and I liked it way better than ClearCase...

But if you're sick and tired of merges going sideways, you hate the fact that your repository is miles away with a 50kbps connection over God knows what, if you hate the fact that blaming and viewing history of a file isn't something you can actually do due to the damn slow connection you have - go ahead, spend some time with Git. Create a GitHub account, maybe a BitBucket account too. Make some repositories, clone them,... Get the feel of what it means being disconnected and free from the ever growing frustration on how slow that damn thing was.

Maybe Mercurial (Hg) would be something closer to your heart. I know it was for me at the beginning. I found it very attractive due to the fact that most of the actual commands are identical to their Subversion counterparts. The "repository" part that Akira mentioned is comparable between Git and Hg, Hg is extremely fast (almost as fast as Git) and in general it is a very nice piece of software.

At the end of the day it is just a tool - it's how you use it that makes the biggest difference.


Matthias.

2012/2/7 Ian Roberts <[hidden email]>
On 07/02/2012 17:45, Akira Ikeda wrote:
> • With svn you got a lot of .svn folders inside your project folders

Not in svn 1.7, that uses a single .svn at the top level in the same way
as git would.

Ian

P.S. ... which makes a mess of one of my projects that looks for a .svn
directory to know whether the folder it's looking at was checked out
from svn :-(

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[hidden email]  | University of Sheffield, UK

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Re: grails with Git or Svn

Ian Roberts
In reply to this post by Matthias Hryniszak
On 07/02/2012 19:47, Matthias Hryniszak wrote:
> At the end of the day it is just a tool - it's how you use it that makes
> the biggest difference.

Absolutely.  We've been using subversion for all our non-open-source
code and documents at work for years and have no problems with it
(though we are all on the same subnet as the repository server which
helps).  We're a mixed team of programmers and non-programmers and I
think the subversion model is easier to get your head around,
particularly for the non-programmers.  But I also have a GitHub account
and I've submitted pull requests for several fixes to grails core and
plugins.  Pick the right tool for the right job.

Ian

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